Living on College- a Mature Aged perspective

Life’ said John Lennon, ‘is what happens while you are busy making other plans.’ Apparently, so the saying goes, ‘Life’ also ‘begins at 40’.

You’re never too ‘Mature aged’ to start embracing the selfie trend!You're never too mature aged to start embracing the selfie trend!

That’s the unexpected thing about our existence. According to our culture, most of us probably began the adulthood journey with a concept of our life’s trajectory. Free spirits with a love of flying solo and seeing the world…happy homebodies perhaps with a significant other installed in our cosy cottage, along with a cute kiddie in designer clothing, and a fluffy pet or three. Oh, and window-boxes augment this charming, country scene. But, as Robbie Burns reminds us in his Scottish dialect Ode to a field Mouse whose home he destroyed with a plough, life is unexpected:

But Mousie, thou art no thy lane,
In proving foresight may be vain:
The best-laid schemes o’ mice an’ men
Gang aft agley,
An’ lea’e us nought but grief an’ pain,
For promis’d joy!

Fortunately, the various life ploughs which ail us humans – including the sobering realities of divorce, death and dashed dreams – are no great match for the community spirit and life-affirming oasis which Res College life offers the mature aged student!  It’s like living in a warm, buzzing beehive, really. Rather than lurking anonymously in the suburbs. Where you ‘always’ have friends over for dinner.

Where else can you find a ready-made group of friends (both young and mature age) to offer study support, hugs, enjoy a DVD or board game with, or join in a quick game of touch footy, soccer kick-around or basketball bounce, before dinner?

Fun and Frivolity old-school style!

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Few can boast a team of chefs creating soups, mains, salad, fruit, dessert, with endless ‘cuppas’…where you don’t have to do the washing up! You can even choose the self-catering option, if you prefer to scoff your own gourmet DIY cuisine and still enjoy the support and company of the College Community.

having cooked for myself for many years, it’s great to have someone else cook for mePic 4

Not only do you have the opportunity to embrace an instant, structured social life, but there is also the convenience of simplifying your financial outlay. It can be soothing to pay just the one bill which covers a range of things – Wi-Fi, heating, water, and parking, did I mention food? Oh, and the transport to classes is easy, simply walk! – and when the juggling act of life begins to toss in flaming torches, there is even an approachable, confidential no-cost Res College Psychologist you can chat too. Can’t ask for much more than that!

Extreme camping, for the young and young at heartPic 5

Pitching in moral support at the cricket
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It’s a relief to have a team of approachable managers and administrators, cleaning and kitchen and maintenance staff, and the university’s gardeners, all working together, for your ultimate benefit. A sports complex – Gym! Yoga classes! – And a friendly university library; even a tranquil, tourist attraction, the Japanese Garden, is right in your backyard!

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Honestly, yes. There will come a day when Gough Whitlam or Wayne Goss pass away, and you weep openly into your cereal, when fresh faced friends innocently make enquiries such as ‘Who is Gough?’ mature age residency at College is a bit like Democracy really – never going to be perfection, but we’re parked as close to that bay as we can manage…

Cosy and colourful for a happy homePic 8tend to the Community Garden, or build your own, if that’s more your stylePic 10

So, if life really does begin at 40 (or 30 or 50 years old) for some of us, in cheerful defiance of The Plough…a Res College can be a very promising place to start, you won’t be the only ‘mature aged’ resident there.

The top five tips of college living

#1 Don’t over pack.

Now, when I first moved to college I was thinking I’d need everything; “oh my god, I certainly can’t not bring 14 pairs of shoes! That would be madness….apparently. We all do it though, think there will without doubt be an occasion that you absolutely need a million options. Trust me, there won’t be, and even if there are no rules saying you can’t go home (or get it posted).

#2 Be a good roommate. Kara and Michaela

I am incredibly lucky, my roommate is amazing, she is the one I go to Kmart with 6 times a week; the one who texts me if dinner is worth getting out of bed for, and the one who reassures me I can definitely finish that 2000 word assignment in one day, no problem. But on the off chance you don’t have the world’s best roommate, you should still follow these few rules; keep common areas clean and don’t be loud and annoying.

#3 Things you won’t think to bring.

  • A cup, a bowl, a plate and a fork. You’ll want them eventually.
  • A printer. Yes I know you could just print at the uni. But the number of people begging to borrow printers mid semester is crazy. If you can get one, get one.
  • Blue tack. I can’t even work out how much I have usedcollege colours during my time at uni. Bring it and bring lots!
  • Bring your college colours! You will play Res shield sport often and early, make sure you can show some college pride!
  • A fan. Summer is hot! I know that isn’t news to anyone, but during last year’s heat wave many residents attempted to buy fans, but they were sold out! Don’t let this happen to you, they can be pulled apart and put away. Be prepared!
  • A spare set of sheets and a spare towel. They will get dirty, and you will not have the four individual one dollar coins to wash them. Bring spare!

#4 Plan! Plan! Plan! weekly planner whiteboard

I am not good at remembering, I am so forgetful. I plan out my weeks and believe it stops those assignments from sneaking up so fast. Additionally when you have res shield every other week, and blogs are due (oops) this really helps to keep you on track. Additionally bring fun coloured whiteboard markers, just cause, fun!

#5 Don’t be scared.

I was so nervous when I moved to college, but after you actually meet everyone and you start interacting with other colleges it isn’t so scary. Don’t stay in your room cause you are too scared to talk to people, get out there and show some courage. There will always be something going on, and we want you to be there, the more people, the more fun!

Decorating and personalising your college bedroom

Before moving to college, many students don’t realise that they can personalise their college rooms. When I first moved to college I packed my favourite doona and pictures of my family and friends. These things are still in my room today, along with lots of other things to decorate my room with.

I thought I would share with you some of my tips to transform that standard college bedroom into your own personal space. Although I am a Resident Advisor this year and have more space than other residents, I still know what it is like to have a normal college bedroom.

  1. Decorate your desk and bookshelf

You will be spending a lot of time at your desk, especially towards the end of the semester when assignments are numerous and exams are creeping their head out from around the corner. Make sure your desk is welcoming so that you don’t dread having to sit there. To ensure that I am as productive as possible, I have created a wall of motivation to help keep me on track. I also have my pens and highlighters in close reach and my USQ wall calendar with all important dates nearby. I have never been the type of person who can sit still so I have also replaced my chair with a gym ball, which helps me to exercise while I’m studying. When personalising your desk make sure you leave enough practical space for your books and computer when you are studying.

Making the most of my study space at exam time20150604_22140320150513_154938My study space has always been personalised and practical. Now that I have my ‘wall of motivation’ I find it so much easier to achieve my study goals.  

  1. Personalise and decorate your bed to ensure you get the best sleep possible

 

It is important to get the recommended amount of sleep each night so that you have enough energy to get through your classes and study for the day. Make your bed as comfortable and personal as you can. I have additional pillows and my own doona my bed. Other residents also like to bring mattress toppers to make their beds softer and more comfortable. Cushions are also a good idea as your bed doubles as a couch when your friends come to chat.

 

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  1. Personalise your bathroom

 

Bathrooms are different for everyone. If you’re accommodation type is one in which you share a bathroom with the entire block than you won’t be able to personalise the bathroom. If you have an ensuite room or only share a bathroom with one other person, you will be able to bring some of your own style into it. Personally, I have some artificial flowers and pink towels and bathmats in my bathroom.

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  1. Photos and Posters

 

Don’t be afraid to put posters, pictures and calendars on your walls to make your room feel like home. I have lots of pictures up around my room (Command stick on hooks are a great way to mount photo frames). I also have paper lanterns, posters and other cool memories, such as invitations on my walls.

 

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  1. Additional items

 

Depending on the amount of space in your room, you might like to bring some additional items. You are more than welcome to bring bar fridges, small fans, small TVs and small bookshelves. Just remember that you have to pack everything up at the end of the year and storage space on college is limited. I have quite a few additional items in my room, including a bookshelf, bar fridge, TV and bedside table.

 

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I’ve had lots of fun decorating my room and making it how I want it to be. I hope these tips help you to personalise and decorate your college room.

Decorating my bedroom

While my standard college room was smaller than my RA flat, I still made sure to decorate and personalise it.

 

Ahead of the pack

High school – the place where all the decisions that need to be made regarding your future are supposed to be made and an action plan to follow through on them is created. Everyone’s path to university is different. Mine started when I was in Year 12 of high school and undertook the Head Start program.

Process from school to uni to career

I completed the Head Start Program offered by USQ to high achieving high school students who are motivated to commence their university studies. The program provides guaranteed entry into your USQ program upon completion of a course successfully, credit points towards your degree, points towards your QCE and the first course is free!

Some USQ Student Ambassadors visited my school and shared their experiences on how they came to study at USQ. I liked USQ because it was close to home (four hours), small classes, I was able to study my degree of choicQuotee full-time and on-campus, and USQ is the number one university in Queensland for graduates entering full-time work. I decided that I wanted to attend USQ. One Student Ambassador spoke about her experience with the Head Start program and I realised that it would give me the ultimate advantage. It gave me a glimpse into what the university experience would be like and what would be expected when I would study full-time, minimising the scare-factor of university (a little). I studied a core business course, externally – Accounting for Decision Making. Going that extra mile, compared to fellow peers provided me with the certainty that I wanted to pursue Accounting as a career.

I would recommend to all high school students to look into undertaking the Head Start program. However, there are certain things to consider:

  • School – your school studies needs to come first. Remember, you are still a high-school student and that is your main priority (there will be plenty of time for uni later).
  • Your Life – you might have dancing, band, sports training that should play apart in your decision. Don’t sacrifice everything in the ‘now’ for the ‘future’ – you still need to enjoy your life to the fullest!
  • Ask your parents/guardians – they know you and their opinions do matter
  • Ask your school teachers/career counsellors – they can are able to help you organise your application
  • USQ – USQ is there to support you 100% throughout the course and are there to answer all your queries and provide information.

The Head Start program has been the best thing I have done for my future career and I would do it again, in a heartbeat! It was a wonderful experience, where you have a graduation evening!

New kid on the block

Hi there!  My name is Alice Galea, originating from Bundaberg with a passion for crafts and baking and am currently studying my second year of my Bachelor of Education, Secondary.  Since completing high school in 2012, I have undertaken a Gap Year, during which I changed my mind from going to the big smoke of Brisbane to the smaller, much more personable environment offered by the University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba.  Since then, many good times were had throughout my first year.

After moving from my home of 18 years in Bundaberg and knowing absolutely no one other than my sister on college, let alone in Toowoomba, I was required to overcome my shy nature, epic homesickness and remain true to myself as a person, in order to make new friends and survive my first year of uni.  I also withstood the new challenges which presented themselves when I studied some third semester subjects back at home!

Some of my favourite events from my first year included a bush dance in o-week, which has thus far been a highlight for my second year.  As well as the fun that was had, the added bonus of this event was its assistance to help to adjust to the cold Toowoomba weather for a few hours (for a cold frog, this was great…but then winter came…)!  The red frogs’ café crawl soon after was also a highlight in order to get to know a some more college faces, as well as few of the fabulous coffee shops around town, of which the Park House is still a favourite (after all…who can resist their cherry ripe hot chocolates…that’s right people…CHERRY RIPE!!!!!!)!  For any first years who are reading this, hopefully they will hold one soon and it is DEFINITELY worth going! :D

coffee friends

Back on college, the social events of Semi-Formal and Formal were definitely the highlights for me for the year.  Seeing the creativity of outfits and the preparation which went into everyone looking their best for each of the nights was lovely to see. :)

semi formal

Thus far, 2015 has been off to a good start on Concannon.  I look forward to keeping you up to date with all of the goings on here and hope that my blogs are insightful.  Catch you next time!

My Study Abroad experience- six weeks in China

It transpires that Kublai Khan, grandson of infamous Genghis Khan, established Beijing as the ‘Northern Capital’. Beijing, with its ‘amazingly mild winter this year!’ in which temperatures hovered around minus 5, and desert-like dryness such that it snowed slightly twice in the six weeks I was there remains China’s capital city. The supreme hardiness of the local people does, for me, hark back to ancient times when the world lacked thermal long-johns and central heating.

This reads 'Beijing' (literally 'Northern Capital')

This reads ‘Beijing’ (literally ‘Northern Capital’)

From mid-December ’14 to late January this year, I had an amazing time studying at Beijing Language and Culture University (BLCU). I learnt Mandarin from 8am to noon each day for five weeks, at the Intensive Winter Language Course.

In class at the BLCU

In class at the BLCU

With dawn just breaking each morning, I pulled on layers of clothing, including facemask and set off for the massive three floor dining hall to start the day with a takeaway steamed bun breakfast, and a warming cup of freshly blended mung beans. The food was amazing.

In the Dining Hall and some of the amazing food I ate while I was in China177 183 280

I had the luxury of my own room in the hotel on campus, which even included a TV. I tuned this constantly to the beautiful (if tragic) Imperial soaps; listening to Mandarin, even while glued to my desk, writing out reams and reams of new characters daily.

My class comprised mostly of lovely, friendly, sweet young South Koreans. I readily embraced the Asian tendency to ‘yi qi qu’ – let’s go together –enjoying many lunches and outings with classmates. We tackled the breathtakingly (literally) steep Great Wall and wandered for hours through the confronting Art Precinct. The Temple of Heaven – at a crisp minus 7, when the rash on my legs hinted I’d forgotten to don thermals beneath jeans – was another cultural highlight of my stay.

Ice skating with my friends

beihaibei 1034

I felt like China had changed since the last time I was here, with the flood of advertisements for Western products all around me. But, as I manically photographed chubby-cheeked babies held aloft by proud parents ‘walking the babies’ in the subdued winter sunshine I realised China hasn’t changed much. The fleets of cleaners on the university grounds, expertly cycling ‘bike utes’ complete with brooms fashioned from tree branches. The shock to my friendly, country Australian system, of the famous Northern ‘lihai’ – formidable – public persona was that small talk was non-existent, along with eye contact which might have been interpreted as customer service.

You discover the humanity-affirming warmth and hospitality of Chinese people when you have established a relationship with them. I travelled to Tianjin on the high-speed train and met the family of my Chinese friend still studying back at USQ. As I hugged her beautiful, welcoming mum, I gave thanks for the priceless personal opportunity which Study Abroad had given me.

I was thrilled to be navigating the Beijing Subway on my own, attending 4 hours of lessons each day (taught in Chinese) and enjoying meals with classmates who didn’t speak any English at all.

Eating in a Café with my friend Yuri Chan

Eating in a Café with my friend Yuri Chan

I talked to students from North Korea, Djibouti, Benin and Kazakhstan. I coped with SWAT squads, sniffer dogs, an incredibly thorough airport pat-down…AND managed to not miss my flight from South Korea to Brisbane, despite chancing upon a Hello Kitty Café moments before boarding.

If you ever, ever get the chance to be a uni student overseas, my advice is, of course you should – surprise yourself! With the backing and assistance of USQ behind you, enrich your life by seeing how other people live! View your home through new eyes upon your return! It is an opportunity you simply cannot miss. Apply today. As the Chinese proverb reminds us “the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step!

RSC – The Crazy Folks

When you first move to college you hear about these Concannon Group Shotweird people who volunteer on your college RSC (Resident Student Club). Why are they weird you may ask? They volunteer their time to do stuff for the college and try to keep residents happy (not an easy job). They sound crazy, but they are actually kind of amazing for juggling everything they do. They plan all major college parties and events, they organise social sports clubs and college merchandise. And why do they do all this? Because they love college. As a second year RSC veteran, I can reassure you that being in the RSC is tough, you do a lot of extra work that often residents don’t notice or realise is necessary, and we do it for free. I like to think of the RSC as the college fun committee, cause it’s what we want college to be, FUN!

There are five positions on the RSC; Secretary, Treasurer, Social Coordinator, Sports Coordinator and President. And although there are different titles within the RSC, we all work together to make sure events are the best they can be.

So what does the President do? From what I have observed my own President doing they keep the team on track and make sure things get done. The President is kind of the boss and boosts up the team when things don’t go to plan.

Next is the Sports Coordinator, Concannon’s Sports Coordinator Alex has unwavering team spirit, the ability to motivate and a never give up attitude. He works with the other colleges to play regular sporting events so that we all occasionally leave our rooms.

On Tabletop mountainSocial Coordinator is next, and I actually have some experience in this role (a little bit last year). The Social Coordinator is in charge of organising all major college social events such as semi-formal and formal.

Secretary and Treasurer are often the forgotten roles, the nerds of the group (I’ve allowed to say it I’m one of them). These roles are responsible for keeping everything legal and everyone on track. Don’t take these two for granted though, they have their own important jobs to do too.

So, what is the best part about being on your colleges RSC? Getting to make college life better. If you see something that needs improving on college, do something or tell someone. We want you to enjoy college, and make it the best it can be. Don’t forget to nominate later this year for the 2016 RSC. THANKS GUYS!

2015 RSC

I didn’t succeed the first time, but don’t think that will stop me!

I don’t like to use the word ‘fail’ because you only truly fail when you give up. There will always be an opportunity to try again. This was something that took me a while to understand, particularly in the job market. I had two unsuccessful attempts at a job before I finally landed the role so I thought I would share with you what I learned on my journey and the eight steps that helped me land that job.

25 more letters

1. Plan
Separate each selection criterion and start to write notes. Plan exactly what you want to say and what examples you are going to use. I used to struggle to complete tasks like job applications and assignments without a plan. Now, my first step is always to create a plan, and that outlines the next steps.

success doens't just happen it is planned for

2. Write
This is where you turn your notes into meaningful sentences and paragraphs. Make sure that all of your responses to the criteria are to the point, that you have given examples of when you have used a certain skill or been in a certain situation, and never ever ramble. Your written application is the first impression you give to the selection panel, make it count!

be so good they can't ignore you

3. Read over and make sure you have addressed all criteria
Once again read over the position description and criteria, then read over the application you have written. This will help to ensure you have addressed the criteria and should help you identify any criterion that you haven’t addressed. This is an important step because the last thing that you want is to send in an application that doesn’t address the criteria or that isn’t relevant to the position you are applying for.

4. Proof-read
Proof-read, proof-read, proof-read! This time when you read through your application, pay attention to your spelling and grammar because spell check won’t find all of your mistakes. Having spelling and grammar mistakes in your application can come across as unprofessional and sloppy and you don’t want to give that impression to your future employer.

proofreading quote

5. Proof-read
Hmm, but haven’t we already proof-read our application? Yes, but we can still make mistakes! Leave your application for a few days and come back to it with fresh eyes. You’d be surprised how many mistakes you can find when you come back to your application later. This time when you are proof-reading, check again that you have addressed the selection criteria and that you don’t have any spelling or grammar errors.

6. Ask someone to read over your application
It is sometimes difficult to find mistakes in your own written work. This happens because you know what you were trying to say and so often you fill in the blanks yourself. Asking a friend or family member to read over your application will help to ensure you have addressed the criteria, your application makes sense and that there are no spelling or grammatical errors.

ask friends to proof read

7. Make changes
Once you’ve had someone else read over your application, ask them for feedback and make any changes you think are necessary.

8. Submit
Read over your application once more and when you are happy with it, submit it to the selection panel.

While the written application is extremely important, it is only the first step in the process. Once you have submitted your application, you should start to prepare for the interview, even if you don’t think you have a shot at landing the job. Here are four tips for preparing for your interview.

1. Know your written application
Know exactly what you said in your written application because the panel may ask questions about it.

2. Practice interview questions with a friend
Ask a friend to help you prepare for your interview and run through questions and scenarios you think the panel may ask you. Practicing before your interview will make the real thing seem a lot less daunting.

3. Plan what you are going to wear
Make sure you dress appropriately for your interview because first impressions count. Wearing business/corporate clothing will go a long way to show that you are professional.

Job interviews quote

4. Remain calm
Nerves are completely understandable. Take a deep breath, remain calm and remember to talk clearly and at a reasonable pace.

keep calm and ace your interview

Don’t be disheartened if you don’t land the job or if your interview doesn’t go as well as you expected. Ask for feedback- yep, you can do that! You should always ask for feedback on your application and interview. Apply that feedback to all future job applications and interviews- Who knows, you might just be successful next time.

Go after what you want quote

McGregor and more . . .

Prior to moving to Toowoomba, it always seemed to be the place I travelled to go shopping or to eat out. Since moving here at the start of last year, I have become a regular at the USQ Residential College, McGregor. My home away from home. Unlike many other Year 12’s who find themselves lost and indecisive when wondering where to go in the future I made my choice at the end of Year 11. I decided that I was going to complete the Head Start program, which would grant me access to USQ and thought that on-campus living would be the best place for me.

If you struggle to get out of your comfort zone, suffer from severe homesickness or find it difficult to meet new people – USQ Residential Colleges maybe the place for you. When I first moved to McGregor I was in a totally different environment than I was used too – it was like not knowing which exit to take on the motorway. I was nervous and quiet, which was the polar opposite from my usual. It wasn’t until I started participating in College events that I actually started to resemble my old self. O’Week was definitely one of the best weeks of my life. We had Rudd’s Rodeo (with legit a bucking bull), Amazing Race, Market Day (where we stocked up on as many freebies as we could) and Sunday Funday (full of waterslides and Red Frogs giving out ice blocks). It was definitely a week I will never fImage 2orget. With the Semi-Formal of a Wild West theme, there were cowboys in chaps, cowgirls with whips and Indians and Cacti – it was quite the sight to see. The formal theme was Vintage and was chic and elegant for everyone. We had thImage 3e best of times dancing and the best meals you get the whole time at College.

 

 

Throughout the year, not only did I go to heaps of RSC events but we played sports all the time (ones I had never even heard of or played before). The day after the McGregor Formal was the Intercollege Touch game. I was so nervous because I had never played before and didn’t want to embarrass myself but they were desperate for players. I ended up having the best time and scored a full field try. From that moment on I wanted to participate in everything ranging from Indoor and Outdoor Cricket to Softball and AFL. I have some of the best memories from these days and truly felt as though I was a part of the College community. College Life is definitely something you want to be a part of. There are numerous hurdles that I have faced since moving to McGregor and I have no doubt there will be many more. Stay tuned!

I want to go home!

I sat in my train seat, teary-eyed, intently watching the small Tilt Train TV screen as each stop passed, waiting for Bundaberg.  For weeks, all I had wanted was to go home…to see my parents, friends, sleep in my own bed, see and experience everything that I missed so dearly throughout my first term at university.  This was me a year ago.  My first month on college was so exciting…I had moved out of home for the first time, giving me a sense of freedom I had never experienced and I had begun the degree of my dreams!  It was all going so well until the excitement wore off and I began to realise the lack of friends, family and quirks taken for granted from home such as not being able to go to town without seeing someone I knew, which resulted in a severe case of homesickness.

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Homesickness is a completely normal experience and just another hard part of growing up!  I know it may not seem like it now, but making the most of being away from home will result in some essential lifelong benefits!  These include developing a sense of self, coping skills and becoming grateful for many things in your life you may have previously taken for granted.  How may you achieve such great results?  I am pleased you asked!  There are many ways in which you can get through this experience, of which I would like to offer my top 5.

  1. Join a group

…Club, team, society or association that interests you.  This provides you with the opportunity to meet prospective like-minded friends.  These people can assist your new town to feel more like home, easing the burden of your homesickness.  If you have moved to be near your university, you will not have to look far to find such opportunities.  Within O-week each year, USQ holds a Market Day which, apart from the opportunity to grab lots of free stuff up for grabs, gives new and continuing students, the opportunity to visit all of the University’s student club stalls and join those of interest. This year, I took this opportunity to join the USQ Charity Committee where I have already met lots of lovely people at our AGM, who I will work with throughout the year, creating events both within the University and wider community, raising money for charities! If you missed Market Day, no worries!  The clubs are always happy to have new members.  For more information on all of the student clubs at USQ, visit the following website: https://www.usq.edu.au/current-students/life/clubs. If nothing quite interests you, contact Phoenix Central and start your own club!  They would love to hear from you!  There are bound to be other students at the University who will want to join your awesome new club!

  1. Do something you enjoy!

This could be anything…from something as simple as going for a serene walk in the Japanese Gardens, closest to Concannon; watching your favourite TV show, playing a sport, cook something outrageous, photographing, attending local markets or enjoying the many shopping opportunities that Toowoomba has to offer.  If you enjoy what you are doing, you will develop a far more positive attitude towards your new town and experience!

 

 

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  1. Remember why you are here

You have made a life changing decision to move away from your home to attend the university of your choice and degree of your dreams!  You are here to be the best nurse, teacher, mathematician…whatever your dream job is.  Be proud of it!  Make the most of this wonderful experience you have embarked on.  You never know what may be around the corner.  Hang in there!  Your journey has only just begun!

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  1. Talk to someone

All of us have adults in our lives who have moved away from home and experienced everything that you are experiencing at this moment.  It is hard.  They want to help you get through this!  I had been feeling homesick for a couple of days and had been doing a very expert job of hiding it from the world.  I was fine to everyone, until Mum called me and asked me how I was…that was it…cue the waterworks!  But it was ok.  My parents then knew how I was feeling and were able to help.

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  1. Seek advice

If all else fails, seek advice from others to find strategies that work for you.  USQ College students have the support of both our Resident Advisors who live with us, as well as our College Community Advisor (Provisional Psychologist), Mel.  At USQ, Student Services also offers a range of services to assist USQ students through this experience, including their free counselling service.  For more information on the services available at Student Services, visit their website: https://www.usq.edu.au/current-students/services.

 

You can do this!  Homesickness is a normal human experience.  Don’t think you are alone.  All of us go through this at some stage.  Find strategies that suit you and your personality to make each day more bearable, and eventually overcome your homesickness.  You can do it!